Showing posts with label Lifestyle. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lifestyle. Show all posts

Financial Must Do's for New Parents Having a Baby


That bundle of love is going to cost you plenty over a lifetime, so start planning now.


Preparing for parenthood isn’t just tiny clothes and heartwarming ultrasound photos; it involves a lot of financial preparation. This guide will lay out the most important financial tasks on your plate from pregnancy to baby’s first years, including:

Estimating your medical costs
Planning leave from your job
Budgeting for the new arrival

Some parenting preparations are best learned on the fly — how to effortlessly and painlessly change the messiest diapers, for instance. But the list of things to do before baby arrives and within his or her first several weeks is lengthy, so tackling certain tasks now is a smart idea.

Pre-Delivery Planning

1. Understand your health insurance and anticipate costs. Having a baby is expensive, even when you have health insurance. You should forecast your expected costs fairly early in the pregnancy. NerdWallet’s guide to making sense of your medical bills can help as you navigate prenatal care, labor and delivery, and the bills that will ultimately follow.

2. Plan for maternity/paternity leave. How much time you and your partner (if you have one) get off work and whether you’re paid during that period can significantly impact your household finances in the coming year. Understand your company’s policies and your state’s laws to get an accurate picture of how your maternity leave will affect your bottom line.

3. Draft your pre-baby budget. Once you know what you’ll be spending on out-of-pocket medical costs, understand how your income will be impacted in the coming months and have prepared a shopping list for your new addition, adjust your budget accordingly. Babies come with plenty of expenses, so set a limit on both necessary and optional buys (like that designer diaper bag or high-end stroller with the LCD control panel), and consider buying used to keep spending under control.


4. Plan your post-delivery budget. Recurring costs such as diapers, child care and extra food will change your household expenses for years to come. Plan for them now so you aren’t caught off guard.

5. Choose a pediatrician within your insurance network. Your baby’s first doctor appointment will come within her first week of life, so you’ll want to have a physician picked out. Talk to friends and family to get recommendations, call around to local clinics and ask to interview a pediatrician before you make your choice. In searching for the right doctor, don’t forget to double-check that he or she is within your insurance network. Ask the clinic, but verify by calling your insurance company so you’re not hit with unexpected out-of-network charges.

6. Start or check your emergency fund. If you don’t already have a “rainy day fund,” now’s the time to anticipate some emergencies. Kids are accident prone, and with the cost of raising a child there’s no telling if you’ll have the disposable income to pay for any unexpected expenses. Having at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses covered is a great place to start.

While in the Hospital

The main focus while you’re in the hospital is having a healthy baby. But there are a few loose ends that will need to be taken care of.

7. Order a birth certificate and Social Security card. Hospital staffers should provide you with the necessary paperwork to get your new child’s Social Security number and birth certificate. If they don’t or if you are having a home birth, contact your state’s office of vital records for the birth certificate and your local Social Security office to get a Social Security card.


Within Baby’s First 30 Days

8. Add your child to your health insurance. In most cases, you have 30 days from your child’s birth date to add him to an existing health insurance policy. In some employer-based plans, you have 60 days. Regardless, do it sooner rather than later, as you don’t want to be caught with a sick baby and no coverage.

9. Consider a life insurance policy on your child. No one expects the tragedy of losing a child, so many parents don’t plan for it. The rates are generally low because a child’s life insurance policy is used to cover funeral costs and little else. When it comes to covering children, a “term” policy that lasts until they are self-sufficient is the most popular choice.

10. Begin planning for child care. Finding the right day care or nanny can take weeks. Get started long before your maternity leave is over. You’ll need time to visit day care centers or interview nannies, as well as complete an application and approval process if required.

Beyond the First Month

You’ll be in this parenting role for years to come, so planning for the future is crucial. Estate planning is a big part of providing for your children, but it isn’t the only important forward-focused task to check off your list.

11. Adjust your beneficiaries. Assuming you already have life insurance for yourself or the main breadwinner in your household — and if you don’t, you should — you may want to add your child as a beneficiary. The same goes for your 401(k) and IRAs. However, keep in mind that you’ll need to make adjustments elsewhere to ensure when and how your child will have access to the money. A will and/or trust can accomplish this.

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12. Disability insurance. You’re far more likely to need disability insurance than life insurance. Make sure you have the right amount of coverage — enough to meet your expenses if you’re out of work for several months. Remember, your monthly living expenses have gone up since the new addition.

13. Write or adjust your will. Tragic things happen and you want to ensure your child is taken care of in the event that one or both parents die. Designate a guardian so the courts don’t have to. Your will is only one part of estate planning, but it’s a good place to begin.

14. Keep funding your retirement. When a child arrives, it’s easy to forget your personal goals and long-term plans in light of this huge responsibility. Stay on top of your retirement plans so your child doesn’t have to support you in old age.

15. Save for his or her education. College is costly, but you can make it more manageable by starting to save early.

Adding a new member to your family comes with a lengthy list of responsibilities, so don’t try to do them all at once. Prioritize and tackle the most important items on your financial to-do list first. Because medical bills and insurance claims will be some of the first financial obligations you’ll encounter while expecting, start there. Move on to budgeting for pregnancy and the first several months of your baby’s life.

With 18 or more years until your little one leaves home, time would seem to be on your side. But — as the saying goes — blink and he’s grown. Now is the time to start taking the steps that will set your family up for financial success.


NerdWallet  June 23, 2015                                                      Time Money


10 Sex things men dont care about

#1 If You Have Morning Breath


Morning breath? Doesn't matter if he's all rearing to go.



#2 Weird Sex Sounds You Make

Don't stay quiet just because you are worried you might make a weird sound. Let go and enjoy. He will.

#3 Where They Have Sex

It doesn't matter where you have sex or if the lights are on or off.



#4 Which Positions You Like

As long as you're in any sex position, he will like it.


#5 If You're Wearing No Makeup

No makeup, he won't care. In fact, guys like girls au naturale.












#6 If Your Hair Isn't Washed

Is he really interested in your hair?











#7 If You've Gained A Few

No man is going to care if you gained a few pounds here or there while making love, so stop worrying.



#8 If You're Too Loud

Go ahead and scream. It will only make him feel like he's the greatest in bed.



#9 Your Hairy Legs

Okay maybe you shouldn't be as hairy as this picture, but a little stubble is not going to both men.

 (picture removed)

#10 The Smell Of Your Vag
 
Guys like your natural scent, so don't worry about covering it up.











5 Ways to Maximize Your Life, Starting This Morning

Many of us have heard the adage, “How you spend your day, is how you spend your life.”  I believe it’s even more micro than that. How you spend the first two hours of your day will determine how you live your life and how productive that life will be.















Giving yourself time in the morning to put yourself in an optimal physical and mental state is equivalent to putting your oxygen mask on first. You can’t help others or thrive until your needs are met first. Here are five easy-but-can't-fail steps for the best start to the rest of your life, every day.


1. Choose not to “snooze.” Anytime you snooze, it’s a negative reaction. You’re losing out on your first commitment to yourself and that sets a bad tone for the rest of your day.


Place your alarm on the other side of the room and start your day off with a victory lap by waking-up when you promised yourself you would. While this may seem small, beginning your day with a victory rather than a loss will have a profound impact on the following 16 hours.


2. Read your affirmations. Affirmations are positive, powerful statements you make to put yourself in the right frame of mind. An example of an affirmation to you can use is: “I am reborn today – yesterday does not matter. I am as good as what I learn, what I create, who I influence and what I inspire today.”












Or, you can take an example from then 4-year-old Jessica whose morning affirmations went viral. We have between 45,000 and 51,000 thoughts a day. Choose to have your first thoughts, every morning, put you into the best frame of mind for a rewarding life.


3. Open your mind by opening a book. Reading in the morning is the most important step you can take to keep your mind open, observant and ready to learn.


As an individual, and especially as an entrepreneur, nothing is more important than learning and getting better, so don't wait until nighttime to focus on your most important objective.
Try a book that’s geared to helping you solve a personal or professional challenge. That will acclimate your mind to thinking through problems, which is a powerfully beneficial habit to form. It is especially useful right before you start your day (which will invariably have its share of challenges).


4. Exercise to thrive. It’s simply not true that exercise is the key to weight loss. Instead of relegating exercise to a means (for weight loss), think of it as the destination.


There are three key reasons regular exercise is a smart business strategy.


First, exercise brings oxygen to your brain, even if you exercise for only 20 minutes. Second, research shows that moderate aerobic exercise can improve your mood for up to 12 hours. Third, exercise is another great opportunity to learn. Listen to an enriching podcast or an educational audiotape while you’re working out.


5. Refuel to feel optimal. What you put into your body to start the day is integral to how you’re going to feel the rest of the day. While opting for a bagel or donut on occasion is something we’re all prone to do, you’ll be amazed how you feel when you switch it up for something that has a well-rounded mix of healthy fats, plant-based protein and complex carbohydrates.















Blending together a smoothie only takes about as much time toasting a slice of bread and slathering it with butter. Consider starting your day with a tablespoon of virgin coconut oil (brain booster) and, after your workout, try a smoothie or breakfast bowl. Need a recommendation? My favorite is red quinoa, almonds, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds and ground flax seeds in a breakfast bowl.
For a smoothie, add brown rice protein powder, cinnamon, almond milk and fresh blueberries to Magic Bullet, Ninja, Vitamix (or whatever blender you have on hand). Mmmm, for the taste buds and the brain.


Try these strategies, or even just one at a time to begin. Jot down how they make you feel and affect the rest of your day. Implementing these strategies will benefit so much more than just your morning.
I believe self-care is social activism! It’s putting that oxygen mask on, first, so you can effect positive change within your workplace, with your family and throughout your community.


Sean Kelly
Sean Kelly


Contributor
Social Entreprenreur, CEO & Co-Founder, www.healthyvending.com










A 7-Minute HIIT Circuit Workout

Seven minutes for a workout — who doesn't have time for that? That's why we've been loving this quick circuit workout from the American College of Sports Medicine, which burns major calories in a short amount of time. Keeping the intensity up — and the rest periods short — is key, so make sure you are pushing yourself during each 30-second spurt! You'll need a mat and a chair or bench. Repeat the circuit up to three times. Learn how to do all the moves here, and get the printable poster of this seven-minute HIIT workout here.




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#Packing a #Suitcase











Packing well is an art: Frequent travelers know how to pack as little as possible while still toting everything they'll need.


We recently published a post on the best hacks for packing a suitcaseSince it's easier to visualize the suitcase, we've created an infographic that shows exactly where each item belongs.
This is what your suitcase should look like:


BI_graphics_PackingSuitcase
Skye Gould/Business Insider


Jennifer Polland and Skye Gould

Teach Your Children to Respect You

The most important value you will ever teach your children is: to respect their parents. And since you cannot pass anything on that you don�t incorporate yourself, you will have to start by first respecting your children. If they don�t feel treated like a human being, worthy of respect and love, deserving of your attention, then their cooperation will be in short supply.



First, you show them respect. Second, you teach them to respect you.



So how to go about this in practice? What to do if your children complain about the food, insult you because you�re picking them up from the gym 10 minutes too late, or if they don�t want to clean up their own mess?



Let�s have a look at these situations one by one:



1. Are the kids complaining about the food? Do you hear a �bwerk� when they see what�s in the casserole? Well, you are no fool, are you? You just spent one hour in the kitchen preparing that meal. Before cooking, you spent one hour at the grocery store buying the food. Before that, you spent many hours on the job, earning the money to pay for that food. So you now start asking yourself, �Did I not give enough of myself for this meal?� Yes, you did! You do not owe it to them to prepare a warm meal every day. But you do owe it to yourself to get some respect from those for whom you make all these efforts. Enough is enough! You did your part of the deal, now it�s up to them. Teach your children to say �thank you� for every meal. If they have no �thank you� on offer but only muster a �bwerk,� then you are not making dinner for at least two days! Soon they�ll be begging you for a warm dinner, and God knows they will be very grateful when they finally get one on the third day! Never continue delivering a service that is not appreciated. You�d be a fool to do that! How does it feel to be toiling away behind the stove, all the while fearing your efforts and goodwill won�t be appreciated? This is no way to live! If they appreciate neither your efforts nor your cooking, then make them go without for 2 or 3 days, and see what happens.



2. Are the kids insulting you just because you�re ten minutes late when picking them up from the gym? Then stop picking them up from the gym for a few times! Make it clear to them that they have to appreciate your effort of taking them and picking them up. Don�t start an argument with them, for that doesn�t work. Don�t keep explaining time and time again that they should respect you, but rather show them by taking action. If they are unable to see the difference between the important facts (you are there to pick them up) and the unimportant facts (being ten minutes too late), then let them feel the difference. Next time around, simply don�t take them to the gym, so they will become aware of the difference and learn to appreciate what you are doing for them. Don�t settle for being treated like a slave. You are worthy of respect! Show them what it means to be a person who respects himself. Respect yourself and others will respect you.



3. Are the kids complaining that �there is nothing to eat� in the house, while the kitchen cupboards are bulging with food? What they mean, of course, is that THEIR favorite food is not available in large enough a quantity. Do your kids have this kind of complaints? Okay, here�s what you do: stop going to the grocery store for a while. That way the kids will have to first finish all the food in the fridge and in the cupboards (or go do some household shopping themselves, also an enlightening exercise). This also makes for an economical cleaning up of all those half-finished packs of crackers, biscuits, cheese, and the like. Then comes the next phase where there really is �nothing� left in the cupboards. Now is the time to go to the grocery store, and you can bet on it that they will appreciate the new arrivals! They will feel like there�s �so much to eat,� while in fact there�s less food than when they were complaining there was �nothing to eat.�



4. Are the kids putting tons of ketchup on their food, continuously ignoring your warnings to be more economical and eat healthier? Stop arguing about it, for that doesn�t work. Instead, stop buying ketchup all the time! For example, buy one bottle of ketchup per month and clearly tell your children that they�ll have to do with this one bottle for the whole month. When the bottle is done, it�s done, till next month comes around. If necessary, buy a bottle for each child and label it. That way your children will learn to regulate their �ketchup behavior.�



5. Are the kids ignoring your orders to put their shoes in the designated place? Do they go on leaving their shoes all around the house? Tell them this will be the last warning, and that from now on, any shoes found scattered around will be �launched� into the back yard. And then, stick to your promise! I had to do this once with my sun�s basketball shoes: I launched them outside. As it happened, that night it was raining cats and dogs. The next morning he cried, �What do I do now? My shoes are all wet!� I said to him, �Sun, this is your problem.� Believe me, I had to do this only once! Once your children know that you will do as you say, then you won�t have to do it. They will respect your word!













6. Are your children�s rooms a mess? You want the mess to be cleaned up? Don�t do it yourself! Your teenagers should clean up their own mess! So instead of arguing about it, tell them that they have to clean up their room before dinner on Saturday. That way you are giving them plenty of freedom to chose their own timing. Come Saturday evening dinnertime, go check if the room is tidy. If not, then there is no dinner for that child. After all, this was the deal: room to be cleaned BEFORE dinner. They can still clean their room right there and then, and have dinner when they�re done, but as long as the room is not clean there is no dinner. You could also say, �You clean your room and after that you can go out with your friends.� Be consistent and do as you say.


This is where many parents stumble when dealing with their children: they argue too much. They go on explaining the same thing dozens of times. Do you really think the kids didn�t understand what you were saying? If you have said something two times, then that�s enough. After the second time, you should ACT and not TALK.



Don�t argue with them! Never argue with a child. You are the parent, you are the one who decides. You can negotiate with your child, but don�t feel you need to explain yourself. Kids have much more energy than you do, and sooner or later you will give up (or give in) because your energy is spent while theirs is not. They know that and they will win the battle! Don�t get tempted to go into endless discussions with your child. Learn to act after the second warning. Be consistent! That�s the only way to get respect.



About The Author
Written by Ineke Van Lint, psychologist. My goal is to help you achieve success and happiness. Accomplish your mission on earth and love yourself. Two free e-courses at http://www.theenthusiasm.com.










Health Insurance for the Recent College Graduate

As you graduate college and head into the great, big, scary world, there are probably a lot of things on your mind. First and foremost is finding a good job, then finding a place to live, and then maybe figuring out how to pay back those student loans. One thing that might not cross your mind is health insurance. All of your life, you�ve most likely been a dependent on your parents� coverage, but that ship is about to sail�if it hasn�t already.



We know what you�re thinking, �Why do I need health insurance? I�m young, I�m healthy, and doctor visits are few and far between. So why pay for something I�ll never use?� Hey, we understand where you�re coming from. But accidents and illnesses happen without warning, even to the strapping young adults such as you. Sure, health insurance is expensive, but not having it will cost you dearly.



First things to know



Let�s get one thing straight, health care in the United States is a nightmare, few will argue that. There are thousands of options when it comes to receiving care and paying for it, some of them good, some of them not so much. When it comes to choosing an insurance policy that�s right for you, confusion abounds. So let�s learn a little more about your options.













There are two essential categories of health insurance: managed care and indemnity plans. Though you�ll pay more for indemnity coverage, it offers much more flexibility than does a managed care plan. Through indemnity coverage, you�ll have your choice of doctor, lab, hospital or specialty clinic. When you seek medical care, you�ll have to pay an out of pocket expense�called a deductible�before your coverage will kick in. Deductibles range from a few hundred dollars up to $1,000 or more, depending on your policy. Also, indemnity plans require a co-payment on medical care



About The Author
Joseph Kenny writes for the UK Loan Store, with some great loan offers and more information on bad credit loans available on site.

Visit Today: http://www.ukpersonalloanstore.co.uk/

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