Showing posts with label Children. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Children. Show all posts

Create A Nautical Nursery for your Little One

With its stripes and sails, this fresh nursery is perfect for sweet boy dreams.


Nautical nursery 

 
 
 Stripe Away
  • Combine striped fabrics and wallpaper in a fun way.
  • Stick to white, light blue, navy and red to create a look that is uniform and traditionally nautical.

Tip:

  • Layer the look by hanging decorative items including stars, fish and boats from hooks.

Ever so Tidy

  • Beware of clutter in a nursery
  • You may not have the luxury of time to keep things neat and tidy
  • Make your life easy by having specific compartments for every item
  • Store nappies, bum cream, powders and ear buds in a neat container on top of the changing area
  • Use a piece of furniture with drawers or a traditional compactum as a changing station to have all the necessities on hand

Match & Match

  • Don't underestimate the power of colour co-ordination.
  • Try to do it throughout, with the toys you display, the bedding and the wall art and general decorations.
  • You will be amazed at the results!
  •  The room will automatically feel like a whole
  • Using white furniture as a base means you can easily update or change the look in the future.

Extend the Theme

  • Using a little boat in different ways- like painted on canvas and cut out of wood- extends the look and theme of the nursery.
  • Wanting to brighten up the bathroom too, buy a packet of stickers and stick it onto the wall, transforming it into a cartoon heaven for any small child. 

It's in

 the detail...

  • Use interesting handles for your cupboards. These handles let the ligh


Moving Homes with Children

Moving city or country is not easy for anyone, but moving with children brings a whole host of considerations into play. Like your fragile glassware, children too need to be handled with care.



 
Tips to make a move smoother
 
 
     
Struggling socially in the beginning after a move is very common, but few children will have lasting effects. Children from families who have relocated revealed feelings of being conspicuous, feeling like the odd-one-out, literally or figuratively not speaking the language, having no idea of how to go about being accepted, and not being able to catch references or understand in-jokes. As a parent, knowing that these are common emotions that your child will experience can allow you to be more empathetic to his moods.


Talking the good and bad emotions through really assists with the settling process. Don’t be surprised by changes in your child’s behaviour while he is settling in. You can expect some regression, some acting out and some grieving. Children who become very withdrawn or aggressive for more than a few weeks should sound alarm bells. Try to talk through his feelings with him, but seek expert advice if you do not see his mood lifting.


The passage of time usually smoothes down the rough patches in a move, but what can you do to lessen the impact of a move on a child’s emotions and behaviour?


Here are some tips for making the move smoother :


Before the move:


1. Tell your child about the move as soon as possible. It gives him time to get used to the idea.
2. Sell him the benefits of the move in a way that he can relate to.
3. Reassure him by telling him what won’t change about the family life.
4. Make the move more concrete by showing pictures of where you are moving to. Older kids can go online and do the research themselves.
5. Say a positive goodbye to all the people and places your child loves. This will assist in achieving closure. It might also help to create a book for each child with photos and contact details of all the important people in their lives.

During the move:



1. Don’t treat the move as a time to discard all your child’s old toys as it will compound the feelings of loss. Take everything he wants even if it stays in the box once you arrive.
2. Let younger children get used to the process by packing their own belongings.
3. Pack a “must have” suitcase for each member of the family containing favourite possessions.

After the move:



1. Re-establish your family routines as quickly as possible.
2. Create a symbolic settling-in ritual like hanging up your wind chimes, or planting a familiar plant from home.
3. Make a game of getting to know the new neighbourhood (and establishing the boundaries of where children can and can’t go).
4. Put a huge effort into helping your kids form friendships by inviting other kids over to play.
5. Allow your child to experience the benefits of the new environment by doing things that he couldn’t do in the old one. Arrange outings and treats.
6. Help your child keep contact with the friends and family left behind by emailing lots of photos.
7. Focus on your relationship with your partner. A strong family nucleus is the source from which your children can draw strength.
Before, during and after the move, you will find yourself wanting to cover your child in bubble wrap to prevent him from experiencing the hard knocks of relocation. But what you might discover is the inner resilience that a move’s juxtaposition of gains and losses unearths in your child and yourself. “Here is the surprise,” admits Debi Hawkins of her move with her two children, “Without Jasmine and Monty I would have dissolved into a self-pity party very often. But having to think about the day-to-day things for them swung my attention from me to them, and they saved me from myself.”





Essential Pregnancy Apps

These apps help you to connect with baby in the womb and stay on top of its development with great health tips too.

SHARE

 
 
 
 
  

What to Expect: Pregnancy Tracker

The popular American pregnancy book's mobile app features a due-date calculator, weekly updates on your baby's development and your changing body, daily tips, photo album, due-date countdown and size estimates.
Read more about it here.
Cost: free. Get it on Android and iTunes.
  

BabyCenter: My Pregnancy Today

Track your baby's development with daily updates and health tips, illustrations and videos.
Read more about it here.
Cost: free. Get it on Google Play and iTunes.

Mediclinic baby: Pregnancy App

This app takes you through your pregnancy week by week, features a weight gain tracker, contraction timer, calendar for you to mark special dates, photo album for your bump pics and list of what to pack for hospital. It also offers more information about the Mediclinic baby programme.
Read more about it here.
Cost: free. Get it on iTunes
Moving city or country is not easy for anyone, but moving with children brings a whole host of considerations into play. Like your fragile glassware, children too need to be handled with care.



 
Tips to make a move smoother
 
 
     
Struggling socially in the beginning after a move is very common, but few children will have lasting effects. Children from families who have relocated revealed feelings of being conspicuous, feeling like the odd-one-out, literally or figuratively not speaking the language, having no idea of how to go about being accepted, and not being able to catch references or understand in-jokes. As a parent, knowing that these are common emotions that your child will experience can allow you to be more empathetic to his moods.


Talking the good and bad emotions through really assists with the settling process. Don’t be surprised by changes in your child’s behaviour while he is settling in. You can expect some regression, some acting out and some grieving. Children who become very withdrawn or aggressive for more than a few weeks should sound alarm bells. Try to talk through his feelings with him, but seek expert advice if you do not see his mood lifting.


The passage of time usually smoothes down the rough patches in a move, but what can you do to lessen the impact of a move on a child’s emotions and behaviour?


Here are some tips for making the move smoother :


Before the move:


1. Tell your child about the move as soon as possible. It gives him time to get used to the idea.
2. Sell him the benefits of the move in a way that he can relate to.
3. Reassure him by telling him what won’t change about the family life.
4. Make the move more concrete by showing pictures of where you are moving to. Older kids can go online and do the research themselves.
5. Say a positive goodbye to all the people and places your child loves. This will assist in achieving closure. It might also help to create a book for each child with photos and contact details of all the important people in their lives.

During the move:



1. Don’t treat the move as a time to discard all your child’s old toys as it will compound the feelings of loss. Take everything he wants even if it stays in the box once you arrive.
2. Let younger children get used to the process by packing their own belongings.
3. Pack a “must have” suitcase for each member of the family containing favourite possessions.

After the move:



1. Re-establish your family routines as quickly as possible.
2. Create a symbolic settling-in ritual like hanging up your wind chimes, or planting a familiar plant from home.
3. Make a game of getting to know the new neighbourhood (and establishing the boundaries of where children can and can’t go).
4. Put a huge effort into helping your kids form friendships by inviting other kids over to play.
5. Allow your child to experience the benefits of the new environment by doing things that he couldn’t do in the old one. Arrange outings and treats.
6. Help your child keep contact with the friends and family left behind by emailing lots of photos.
7. Focus on your relationship with your partner. A strong family nucleus is the source from which your children can draw strength.
Before, during and after the move, you will find yourself wanting to cover your child in bubble wrap to prevent him from experiencing the hard knocks of relocation. But what you might discover is the inner resilience that a move’s juxtaposition of gains and losses unearths in your child and yourself. “Here is the surprise,” admits Debi Hawkins of her move with her two children, “Without Jasmine and Monty I would have dissolved into a self-pity party very often. But having to think about the day-to-day things for them swung my attention from me to them, and they saved me from myself.”





Single Parent Dating

Dating can be stressful for many people, add being a single parent to the equation, and it can be that much harder. After a divorce single parents need time to get used to their new routine, such as child-custody arrangements and spending quality time with their children, while juggling many other things.


Moreover, while the courts may dictate a custody arrangement, all too often one parent may choose to consistently deviate from the plan, making it challenging for the other to plan their time. Still, when enough time has passed and you are ready to embark on your dating journey, it’s important to gather your resources of family, friends and babysitters in order to carve out the time and energy for this process.


Parent_Child_0












First, there are many ways to meet new potential dates. You may want to try online dating, meet ups, single parent groups or new activities, such as dance lessons. It’s at events like these that you can meet someone with common interests. However, before you go on that first date, you need to do a few things. I suggest a makeover—from the inside out!


This means, if you need professional help to move past your divorce, your ex or any other issue that would spill into a new relationship, don’t be afraid to get it. Next, work with a dating coach who can bring you up to date on the new dating landscape while reviewing with you the dos and don’ts of dating.




An image consultant will help you assess and recommend changes to your wardrobe, hairstyle, make-up, etc. They may even recommend having your teeth whitened. This may all sound superficial, but the fact is, looking your best has a direct correlation to feeling good about yourself, which makes for great first impressions.


When it comes to your kids, if they’re of an age where they can understand, let them know what you’re doing. Tell them you’re looking for a friend to have fun with. Reassure them of your love for them and that even when you’re out, they’re always in your heart and your thoughts.
Then, be sure to make appropriate childcare arrangements for peace of mind, so that you don’t feel guilty about going out and having a good time.


Children of any age can get attached to any partner you choose, so it’s important to avoid having a revolving door of men or women around your children. Only introduce someone to your kids when you feel there is potential for a long-term relationship, and after you’ve vetted them enough to know it’s safe to have them around your kids.


Dating is about getting to know each other, keeping things light and having fun. The key to balance when dating as a single parent is to always be present. When you’re with your children, be with your children. And, when you’re on a date, be with your date.


Share your time saving tips, blogs, recipes, and ideas for better living with Getting Balance’s community of women seeking happiness and wellbeing today.












Project Eve Moms



12 Things Marriage Is and 12 Things It Isn't

24 years of marriage.
That's what September 15th meant for me.
We had celebrated earlier so I didn't remember until I was driving to work. I called him. Told him I loved him. I got grocery store flowers when I got home. Beautifully arranged by the way.
What ever did we do without grocery store flowers?
Between being a marital therapist and my own experience, I have learned a few things. Since I am on year #24, I've divided them into 12's. Just to be cute.


12 Things That Marriage Is Not:


1. Marriage is not for sissies. It's hard work.
2. Marriage is not about getting what you want all the time. It's not a dictatorship. It's not wanting to win all the time because that would mean the other person would lose all the time. May be OK for you. Not good for the marriage.
3. Marriage is not rocket science. The principles it's based on are really pretty simple. Kindness. Respect. Loyalty. That kind of thing.
4. Marriage is not unfashionable. It stays vital. Even Brangelina must think so.
5. Marriage is not in and of itself stimulating. Since you are with the same person over a long time, the two of you can get in a rut. You have to keep things fresh.
6. Marriage is not about collecting things. The joys of marriage aren't tangible. You live them. That's what makes them so very special.
7. Marriage is not for the impatient. Some of the best stuff takes a while to develop. You have to stick around to find that out.
8. Marriage is not the place for criticism. For abuse. If it is found there, it will ruin any chance of true intimacy or trust and dissolve the hope that once might have existed.
9. Marriage is not a 24-hour repair shop. Your marital partner is not supposed to meet your every need. Some of those needs you may have to take care of yourself. Through your friendships or other activities.
10. Marriage is not self-sustaining. It does not thrive on its own. If all you focus on is the kids, you are making a mistake.
11. Marriage is not boring. Two lives woven together can be quite exciting! There's just something about watching someone very different from you, living their life in an extremely different way. Up close and personal. You learn from that.
12. Marriage is not without conflict. Knowing how to disagree and work through anger and disappointment is probably the key to lots of stuff going well. Getting to that cooperating, mentioned in #2.












2014-09-26-Marriageisgettingirritatedbythethingsthatalwaysirritateyou.Andtoleratingitbecauseitiswayoverbalancedbythegoodstuff1.jpg


12 Things That Marriage Is:


1. Marriage is the potential for an intense, deep and diverse intimacy. Sexual. Emotional. Relational.
2. Marriage is knowing someone has your back. Always. You have theirs. It's about interdependence.
3. Marriage is realizing that you have been seen in your worst times, and that you are still loved. There's an overriding sense of gratitude and security.
4. Marriage is sharing old jokes. Or some story that may be told over and over but it still makes you laugh 'til you are left gasping for breath.
5. Marriage is getting teary-eyed together.
6. Marriage is thinking about the other one not being there anymore. And not being able to think about it.
7. Marriage is getting irritated by the things that always irritate you. Have irritated you for 24 years. Will irritate you for 24 more. And tolerating it because it is way overbalanced by the good stuff.
8. Marriage is not being able to wait to get home to share some little something.
9. Marriage is wishing you were the one having the operation. Or the illness. Not him.
10. Marriage is sometimes fighting. Trying to slowly learn to fight more fairly. To apologize. To listen. To learn. To find resolution.
11. Marriage is about vulnerability. Giving someone the right to hurt or disappoint you. While simultaneously giving that someone the opportunity to bring you tremendous joy and laughter.
12. Marriage is a promise. A vow. To try the hardest you have ever tried in your life. Marriage is a place for the achievement of a personal integrity like no other.
I'm now living year #25.


So far. So good. Thanks for reading! You can find more from Dr. Margaret at


http://drmargaretrutherford.com!


Dr. Margaret Rutherford Headshot










Child Safety in Cars...











Constipation in Children











O n this page
Constipation is a very common problem for children. For most children, constipation means passing hard poo (faeces, stools or motions), with difficulty, less often than normal. Regular soiling (often mistaken for runny diarrhoea) may indicate that a child has bad constipation with impaction (a blockage of faeces). Where no particular disease or illness is the cause of the constipation, it is called idiopathic constipation. It is important that constipation be recognised early to prevent it from becoming a long-term (chronic) problem. Note: there is a separate leaflet called Constipation in Adults.
Parents often get very worried about their child's bowel habit. This anxiety can start when the child is a baby, with concern over the number of dirty nappies. The main thing to realise is that every child is different. Normal can vary quite a bit. It is a change in what is normal for your child, that suggests a problem.
Babies will open their bowels anything from several times per day, to once every few days. The frequency of bowel movements is not very important. What is important is that the poo (faeces, stools or motions) is soft and easily passed.
Breast-fed babies tend to pass runnier, mustard yellow-coloured stools. This is because breast milk is better digested than infant formula (bottle feeds). Newborn breast-fed babies may open their bowels with every feed. However, it is also normal for a breast-fed baby to go up to a week without a bowel movement.
Bottle-fed babies often need to open their bowels daily, as the stools are bulkier. Bottle-fed baby stools smell worse (more like an adult's).
It is not uncommon for your baby's stools to vary in colour and consistency from day to day. Any prolonged change to harder, less frequent stools might mean constipation.
As babies are weaned to solid foods, their stools will change in colour and smell. The frequency may again change. Generally, the stools become thicker, darker and a lot more smelly. You will notice that your baby's stools will alter depending upon what you have fed him or her. Some high-fibre foods, such as raisins, may even pass through your baby's bowels virtually unchanged, appearing in the nappy at the next change.
As your baby grows up, into a toddler and then a young child, you may see further changes in their stool frequency and consistency, often dependent on what they are eating.
As you can see, there is great variation in a child's bowel habit, dependent on their age and what they are fed. As already mentioned, it is a change in what is normal for your child, that suggests a problem. Anything from three times a day to once every other day is common and normal. Less often than every other day means that constipation is likely. However, it can still be normal if the stools are soft and well formed, and passed easily.
It may be normal for your baby to go a bit red in the face when straining to pass a stool. Constipation is more of a problem than this. Breast-fed babies seldom get constipated, as breast milk contains exactly the right balance of nutrients to keep the stools soft and easily passed.
Diarrhoea usually means very runny stools, often passed more frequently than normal. Breast-fed babies get diarrhoea less frequently than other babies, as breast milk has a protective effect against the germs that can cause diarrhoea.
Constipation in children or babies can mean any, or all, of the following:
  • Difficulty or straining when passing stools.
  • Pain when passing stools, sometimes with a tiny amount of blood in the nappy or on the toilet paper, due to a small tear in the skin of the back passage (anus).
  • Passing stools less often than normal. Generally, this is less than three complete (proper) stools per week.
  • Stools that are hard, and perhaps very large, or pellet-like and small, like rabbit droppings.










Other symptoms of constipation

As well as less frequent, hard (and perhaps painful) stools, constipation can cause:
  • Tummy ache (abdominal pain).
  • Poor appetite.
  • General malaise (feeling 'off colour').
  • Behavioural changes, such as being more irritable or unhappy.
  • Fidgeting, restlessness and other signs that the child needs to go to the toilet.
  • Feeling sick (nausea).
Severe constipation can cause impaction (where a very large stool is stuck in the rectum). This can cause further symptoms. In particular, this can cause a child to soil their pants regularly with very soft faeces, or with faecal-stained mucus. This is often mistaken by parents as diarrhoea. Impaction is discussed in detail later.
  • Idiopathic constipation. This is common. The word idiopathic means of unknown cause. Various factors may be involved (discussed later), but many children become constipated for no known reason.
    • Short bouts of constipation. It is common for children and babies to have a bout of mild constipation for a day or so. This may settle quickly, often without the need for medical treatment.
    • Long-term constipation. In about 1 in 3 children who become constipated, the problem becomes more long-term (persistent). This is also called chronic idiopathic constipation.
  • Constipation due to an underlying disease or condition. This is uncommon. The constipation is said to be secondary to this other problem. Some examples of conditions and problems that can cause constipation are:
    • Some neurological conditions.
    • An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism).
    • Cystic fibrosis.
    • Rare diseases with abnormal development of the bowel, such as Hirschsprung's disease.
    • As a side-effect of certain medications that a child has to take for another condition.
Treatment may involve treating the underlying condition (if that is possible) in addition to tackling the constipation. Worrying symptoms or signs that may indicate a secondary cause include the following. These should be mentioned to your GP. It is also possible that some of these symptoms could mean your child is more seriously unwell:
  • Being sick (vomiting).
  • Weight loss or failure to gain weight (thrive).
  • A swollen, stretched tummy.
  • Severe pain.
  • A baby that does not pass its first stool (called meconium) within the first 48 hours of life.
  • Abnormalities of the back passage (anus) - for example, if it is closed over.
  • Nervous system (neurological) problems such as weak or paralysed legs.
  • Sores or ulcers near the anus.
  • Excessive thirst.
  • Urinary symptoms - such as passing huge volumes of urine, urine that is very dark or painful urination with smelly urine.
  • Very pale-coloured stools (especially if the urine is very dark too).
The rest of this leaflet is about idiopathic constipation.
Tests are not normally needed to diagnose idiopathic constipation. Your GP is likely to ask various questions and do a general examination to rule out secondary causes of constipation. By examining your child's tummy (abdomen), a GP can tell if there are lots of stools in the bowel. This can give an indication if blockage (impaction - discussed later) has developed. (If an underlying cause of constipation is suspected, your GP will refer your child to a children's doctor (a paediatrician) and further tests may be done.)
Idiopathic means that there is no disease or known cause for the constipation. However, it is thought that various factors may contribute to constipation developing, or make it worse. These include diet, stool holding and emotional factors.

Diet

Dietary factors that may play a part in constipation are:
  • Not eating enough foods with fibre (the roughage part of the food that is not digested and stays in the gut).
  • Not having enough to drink.
Stools tend to become harder, drier, and more difficult to pass if there is little fibre and fluid in the gut.

Stool holding

This means the child has the feeling of needing the toilet, but resists it. The child holds on to the stool, trying to ignore the desire to empty the bowels. This is quite common. You may see your child crossing their legs, sitting on the back of the heels, or doing similar things to help resist the feeling of needing the toilet. Your child may clench his or her buttocks to try to stop the stool from coming out, and may seem quite fidgety. You may notice smudges of stool on your child's pants, often when they are unable to hold on any longer. The longer the child holds on, the bigger the stool gets. Eventually the child has to go, but the large stool is more difficult to pass, and often more painful. This may lead to a bit of a vicious cycle where the child is even more reluctant to open his or her bowels the next time. There are a number of reasons why children may hold on to stools:
  • A previous stool that they passed may have been a struggle or painful. So, they try to put off doing it again.
  • Their back passage (anus) may be sore or have a crack (anal fissure) from passing a previous large stool. It is then painful to pass further stools. So, the child may resist the urge to pass a stool.
  • They may have a dislike of unfamiliar or smelly toilets, such as at school or on holiday. The child may want to put things off until they get home.

Emotional problems

Constipation problems may be made worse with upset due to change in surroundings or routine. Common examples are moving house and starting nursery. Potty training may be a factor if a child becomes scared of using the potty. Fears and phobias are usually the underlying reasons for these problems.
Impaction means that the bowel is, in effect, blocked by a large amount of hard stool. Idiopathic constipation with impaction most commonly develops in children between the ages of 2 and 4 years, but older or younger children can be affected. Symptoms and features include:
  • Recurrent episodes when the child is uncomfortable or distressed trying to pass a stool.
  • The child soils their pants regularly with very soft faeces, or with faecal-stained mucus. This is often mistaken by parents as diarrhoea.
  • The child may also become irritable, not eat much, feel sick, have tummy pains from time to time, and may be generally out of sorts.
  • A doctor can often feel a backlog of hard, lumpy stools when he or she examines the child's tummy (abdomen).
The diagram below shows how a child may develop impaction, and the symptoms this may cause.
chronic constipation in children
  • Normally, stools build up in the lowest part of the bowel.
  • When stools accumulate, they start to pass into the last part of the bowel (the rectum), which stretches. This sends nerve messages to the brain, telling you that you need to empty your bowels.
  • If the stool is not passed out then more stools from higher up also reach the rectum.
  • Eventually, large hard stools may build up in the rectum.
  • The rectum may then stretch and enlarge (dilate) much more than normal, to cope with the excessive amount of stools.
  • A very large stool may develop and get stuck (impacted) in an enlarged rectum.
  • If the rectum remains enlarged then the normal sensation of needing the toilet is reduced. The power to pass out a large stool is also reduced (the rectum becomes 'floppy').
  • More stools build up in the colon behind the impacted stool in the rectum.
  • The lowest part of an impacted stool lies just above the back passage (anus). Some of this stool liquefies (becomes runny) and leaks out of the anus. This soils the child's pants or bedclothes. Also, some softer, more liquid stools from higher up the colon may bypass around the impacted hard stool. This also leaks out and soils the pants or bedclothes and can be mistaken for diarrhoea. The child has no control of this leaking and soiling.
  • When a stool is eventually passed, because the rectum is distended and weakened, it simply fills up fairly quickly again with more hard stool from the backlog behind.

Laxatives

Idiopathic constipation that has lasted for more than a few days is usually treated with laxatives. Your doctor will advise on the type and strength needed. This may depend on factors such as the age of the child, severity of the constipation and the response to the treatment. Laxatives for children commonly come either as sachets or a powder that is made up into a drink, or as liquid/syrup. The laxatives used for children are broadly divided into two types.
  • Macrogols (also called polyethylene glycols) are a type of laxative that pulls fluid into the bowel, keeping the stools soft. They are also known as osmotic laxatives. For example, Movicol® Paediatric Plain is one brand that is commonly used first. This is mixed into water to make a drink to which cordial, such as blackcurrant squash, can be added to make it taste nicer. Lactulose is another type of osmotic laxative.
  • Stimulant laxatives. These encourage (stimulate) the bowel to pass the stools out. There are several different types of stimulant laxative. Sodium picosulfate, bisacodyl, senna and docusate sodium are all examples. A stimulant laxative tends to be added in addition to a macrogol if the macrogol is not sufficient on its own.










Laxatives are normally continued for several weeks after the constipation has eased and a regular bowel habit has been established. This is called maintenance treatment. So, in total, the duration of treatment may be for several months. Do not stop the laxatives prescribed abruptly. Stopping laxatives abruptly might cause the constipation to quickly recur. Your doctor will normally advise a gradual reduction in the dose over a period of time depending on how the stools have become in their consistency and frequency. Some children may even require treatment with laxatives for several years.

Treatment of impaction - if needed

Similar treatments are used for the the treatments listed above. The main difference is that higher doses of laxatives are needed initially to clear the large amount of faeces blocking the last part of the bowel (the rectum). Secondly, laxatives are also usually needed for much longer, as maintenance treatment. The aim is to prevent a build-up of hard stools recurring again, which will prevent impaction returning.
As a result of maintenance treatment:
  • The enlarged rectum can gradually get back to a normal size and function properly again.
  • Constipation is then unlikely to recur.
If laxatives are stopped too soon, a large stool is likely to recur again in the weakened 'floppy' rectum which has not had time to get back to a normal size and strength.
Treatment to clear impacted stools from the rectum can be a difficult time for you and your child. It is likely that your child will actually have a few more tummy pains than before, and that there will be more soiled pants. It is important to persevere, as these problems are only temporary. Clearing the impacted stools is an essential part of treatment.
In rare instances, where treatment of impacted stools has failed, a child may be treated in hospital. In hospital, stronger medicines to empty the bowel, called enemas, can be given via the rectum. For very hard to treat cases, a child can have a general anaesthetic and the bowel can be cleared out manually by a surgeon.










Diet

Dietary measures should not be used on their own to treat idiopathic constipation, as it will be unlikely to solve the problem. However, it is still important to get a child into a habit of eating a good balanced diet. This is to include plenty of drinks (mainly water) and foods with fibre. This will help to prevent a recurrence of constipation once it has cleared.
Eating foods with plenty of fibre and drinking plenty makes poo (faeces, stools or motions) that is bulky, but soft and easy to pass out. Getting plenty of exercise is also thought to help.

Food and fibre

This advice applies to babies who are weaned, and children. Foods which are high in fibre are: fruit, vegetables, cereals, wholemeal bread. A change to a high-fibre diet is often 'easier said then done', as many children are fussy eaters. However, any change is better than none. Listed below are some ideas to try to increase your child's fibre intake:
  • A meal of jacket potatoes with baked beans, or vegetable soup with bread.
  • Dried (or semi-dried) apricots or raisins for snacks.
  • Porridge or other high-fibre cereals (such as Weetabix®, Shredded Wheat® or All Bran®) for breakfast.
  • Offering fruit with every meal - perhaps cut up into little chunks to make it look more appealing.
  • Perhaps do not allow sweets or desserts until your child has eaten a piece of fruit.
  • Another tip for when children are reluctant to eat high-fibre foods is to add powdered bran to yoghurt. The yoghurt will feel grainy, but powdered bran is tasteless.

Drink

If a bottle-fed baby has a tendency to become constipated, you can try offering water between feeds. (Never dilute infant formula (milk) that is given to bottle-fed babies.) Although it is unusual for a breast-fed baby to become constipated, you can also offer water between feeds. Older, weaned babies can be given diluted fruit juice (preferably without added sugar). Pureed fruit and vegetables are the usual starting points for weaning, after baby rice, and these are good for preventing constipation.
Encourage children to drink plenty. However, some children get into the habit of only drinking squash, fizzy drinks or milk to quench their thirst. These may fill them up, and make them less likely to eat proper meals with food that contains plenty of fibre. Try to limit these kinds of drinks. Give water as the main drink. However, fruit juices that contain fructose or sorbitol have a laxative action (such as prune, pear, or apple juice). These may be useful from time to time if the stools become harder than usual and you suspect constipation may be developing.

Some other tips which may help

  • Try to get children into a regular toilet habit. After breakfast, before school or nursery, is often best. Try to allow plenty of time so they don't feel rushed.
  • Some kind of reward system is sometimes useful in younger children prone to holding on to stools. You could give a small treat, or use stickers or star charts to reinforce the message.
  • Praise your child for passing a stool in the potty or toilet, but do not punish accidents. It is easy to become frustrated with soiled pants or a child who refuses to pass a stool.
  • Try to keep calm and not make a fuss over the toilet issue. If your child can see that you are stressed or upset, they will pick up on this feeling, and the toileting issue can become even more of a fraught battle. The aim is to be 'matter of fact' and relaxed about it.

Further help & information

Original Author:
Dr Tim Kenny
Current Version:
Peer Reviewer:
Dr John Cox
Last Checked:
28/02/2013
Document ID:
4584 (v41)
© EMIS

Why Some Pregnancy Books Cause More Harm Than Good

With the rise in holistic medicine and alternative healing, it�s surprising Dr. Jennifer Barham-Floreani�s Well Adjusted Babies is one of the few pregnancy books available on the subject for mothers and babies. �Dr. Jen� as she is known, must be an overachiever type, because the book is over 700 pages!

The length also tells us that there was a huge untapped need for pregnancy books about holistic healing for babies and kids.

Well Adjusted Babies has been out a few years now. And yet nothing seems to have changed in the world of traditional pregnancy books. There is barely a whisper in most of them about anything holistic.

That�s like a 90-story skyscraper being built next to your house and you pretend you don�t see or hear anything!











A U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Center for Disease Control and Prevention study said the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine has grown by leap and bounds from 2002 to 2009.

In Australia, the Alternative and Complementary Medicine industry is estimated to be worth over $1 billion and growing at over 30% per year.

And yet, traditional pregnancy books reflect the values of the larger world of mainstream medicine in general: treat the symptoms while avoiding or ignoring the root cause.

The only thing involving preventive care for most traditional medical practitioners is changing the oil every month in their luxury cars.

It�s funny they call it �traditional medicine� when over reliance on drugs and symptomology is fairly recent in history. Some so called �alternative� medical practices have been effective for 5,000 years!

So has Dr. Jen mellowed her message?

Let�s see�in recent years she�s published the 2nd edition of Well Adjusted Babies with new chapters, case studies, and the latest research; expanded her website and blog WellAdjustedBabies.com; and recently she completed a series of TV and radio appearances around Australia.

Looks like she�s in to win it.

...

About Dr Jennifer Barham-Floreani

Recently awarded �Woman of the Year� (WCWC) and �Australian Chiropractor of the Year�, Dr Jennifer is an accomplished pediatric chiropractor with four children of her own. Aside from pregnancy books, Dr Jennifer also regularly writes information for parents and chiropractors about holistic parenting in her blog.

If you would like to find out more information about Dr Jennifer, her books, or visit her free Pregnancy & Parenting resource blog, please take a look at http://www.welladjusted.me
About The Author
Matt is an independent journalist and pregnancy books reviewer based in Melbourne.
The author invites you to visit:
http://www.welladjustedbabies.com










The Importance of Play in a Child's Life

It�s true that education is like a building block for a child�s future. All parents dream for a better career for their child�s life. Everybody wants their child to be doctor, engineer and wants to see them in high posts. In this cut throat competition children get pressurize with their activities to the extent that they don�t get spare time for their own entertainment. Teachers also keep the child busy during the holidays by giving them assignments and homework. Earlier children used to play with their siblings. So, the children easily got a play environment at the home. However, now the time spent by children in playing was very less as compared to the past two decades. Parents should understand that play is an important activity and they should not deprive their child from this opportunity.











Group games allow children to learn the values of team spirit. It also teaches them to cooperate with other members of the team and develop self discipline. This also enables them to face negative situation in life and make them strong when they get defeated. Many studies have proved that children playing games which have lots of violence are likely to be more short tempered and aggressive.

It is the duty of the parents to find out whether the child knows the difference between fantasy and reality. When this problem is not uprooted in the initial stages then it can take very ugly turn in child�s life and they will start presuming that real life is also like the games which they play. It will have a negative impact on children mind because inappropriate games will impart wrong set of values in them. Through play children develop essential life skills; they also learn how to interact with their peers and adults. It is through play that children develop essential life skills; they learn how to interact with their peers and with adults.

There are certain benefits that child get after playing. These benefits are given below:

1. Reduces fear, anxiety, stress, irritability

2. Creates joy, intimacy, self-esteem and mastery not based on other's loss of esteem

3. Improves emotional flexibility and openness

4. Increases calmness, resilience and adaptability and ability to deal with surprise and change

5. Decreases tactile defensiveness

6. Healing process for hurts

7. Enhances feelings of acceptance of difference

8. Increases empathy, compassion, and sharing

9. Creates options and choices

10. Models relationships based on inclusion rather than exclusion

11. Alternative to aggressor-victim model of relationships

12. Decreases revenge and need for self defense

13. Improves touch and nonverbal socialization skills

14. Increases attention and attachment capacities

15. Positive emotions increase the efficiency of immune, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems

16. Decreases stress, fatigue, injury, and depression

17. Integrates sensor motor, kinesthetic and emotional responses

In conclusion every child should be allowed to play as they learn so many skills from playing, and from defeating. Play is essential for every child�s development as it make them well balanced grown up and prepare with all the essential life skills needed.

About The Author
This article has been written and posted by the team of OnlineSchoolAdmissions � a portal that provides free of cost consultancy to parents and schools for fast and easy online school admission process. Parents can locate best schools in bangalore or school admission form of their choice selected from the directory of schools listed on the site and applies to them. They can also search for carmel convent school bhopal as per their choice and fill up the school application forms online. Visit more details at:- http://www.onlineschooladmissions.com/

Teach Your Children to Respect You

The most important value you will ever teach your children is: to respect their parents. And since you cannot pass anything on that you don�t incorporate yourself, you will have to start by first respecting your children. If they don�t feel treated like a human being, worthy of respect and love, deserving of your attention, then their cooperation will be in short supply.



First, you show them respect. Second, you teach them to respect you.



So how to go about this in practice? What to do if your children complain about the food, insult you because you�re picking them up from the gym 10 minutes too late, or if they don�t want to clean up their own mess?



Let�s have a look at these situations one by one:



1. Are the kids complaining about the food? Do you hear a �bwerk� when they see what�s in the casserole? Well, you are no fool, are you? You just spent one hour in the kitchen preparing that meal. Before cooking, you spent one hour at the grocery store buying the food. Before that, you spent many hours on the job, earning the money to pay for that food. So you now start asking yourself, �Did I not give enough of myself for this meal?� Yes, you did! You do not owe it to them to prepare a warm meal every day. But you do owe it to yourself to get some respect from those for whom you make all these efforts. Enough is enough! You did your part of the deal, now it�s up to them. Teach your children to say �thank you� for every meal. If they have no �thank you� on offer but only muster a �bwerk,� then you are not making dinner for at least two days! Soon they�ll be begging you for a warm dinner, and God knows they will be very grateful when they finally get one on the third day! Never continue delivering a service that is not appreciated. You�d be a fool to do that! How does it feel to be toiling away behind the stove, all the while fearing your efforts and goodwill won�t be appreciated? This is no way to live! If they appreciate neither your efforts nor your cooking, then make them go without for 2 or 3 days, and see what happens.



2. Are the kids insulting you just because you�re ten minutes late when picking them up from the gym? Then stop picking them up from the gym for a few times! Make it clear to them that they have to appreciate your effort of taking them and picking them up. Don�t start an argument with them, for that doesn�t work. Don�t keep explaining time and time again that they should respect you, but rather show them by taking action. If they are unable to see the difference between the important facts (you are there to pick them up) and the unimportant facts (being ten minutes too late), then let them feel the difference. Next time around, simply don�t take them to the gym, so they will become aware of the difference and learn to appreciate what you are doing for them. Don�t settle for being treated like a slave. You are worthy of respect! Show them what it means to be a person who respects himself. Respect yourself and others will respect you.



3. Are the kids complaining that �there is nothing to eat� in the house, while the kitchen cupboards are bulging with food? What they mean, of course, is that THEIR favorite food is not available in large enough a quantity. Do your kids have this kind of complaints? Okay, here�s what you do: stop going to the grocery store for a while. That way the kids will have to first finish all the food in the fridge and in the cupboards (or go do some household shopping themselves, also an enlightening exercise). This also makes for an economical cleaning up of all those half-finished packs of crackers, biscuits, cheese, and the like. Then comes the next phase where there really is �nothing� left in the cupboards. Now is the time to go to the grocery store, and you can bet on it that they will appreciate the new arrivals! They will feel like there�s �so much to eat,� while in fact there�s less food than when they were complaining there was �nothing to eat.�



4. Are the kids putting tons of ketchup on their food, continuously ignoring your warnings to be more economical and eat healthier? Stop arguing about it, for that doesn�t work. Instead, stop buying ketchup all the time! For example, buy one bottle of ketchup per month and clearly tell your children that they�ll have to do with this one bottle for the whole month. When the bottle is done, it�s done, till next month comes around. If necessary, buy a bottle for each child and label it. That way your children will learn to regulate their �ketchup behavior.�



5. Are the kids ignoring your orders to put their shoes in the designated place? Do they go on leaving their shoes all around the house? Tell them this will be the last warning, and that from now on, any shoes found scattered around will be �launched� into the back yard. And then, stick to your promise! I had to do this once with my sun�s basketball shoes: I launched them outside. As it happened, that night it was raining cats and dogs. The next morning he cried, �What do I do now? My shoes are all wet!� I said to him, �Sun, this is your problem.� Believe me, I had to do this only once! Once your children know that you will do as you say, then you won�t have to do it. They will respect your word!













6. Are your children�s rooms a mess? You want the mess to be cleaned up? Don�t do it yourself! Your teenagers should clean up their own mess! So instead of arguing about it, tell them that they have to clean up their room before dinner on Saturday. That way you are giving them plenty of freedom to chose their own timing. Come Saturday evening dinnertime, go check if the room is tidy. If not, then there is no dinner for that child. After all, this was the deal: room to be cleaned BEFORE dinner. They can still clean their room right there and then, and have dinner when they�re done, but as long as the room is not clean there is no dinner. You could also say, �You clean your room and after that you can go out with your friends.� Be consistent and do as you say.


This is where many parents stumble when dealing with their children: they argue too much. They go on explaining the same thing dozens of times. Do you really think the kids didn�t understand what you were saying? If you have said something two times, then that�s enough. After the second time, you should ACT and not TALK.



Don�t argue with them! Never argue with a child. You are the parent, you are the one who decides. You can negotiate with your child, but don�t feel you need to explain yourself. Kids have much more energy than you do, and sooner or later you will give up (or give in) because your energy is spent while theirs is not. They know that and they will win the battle! Don�t get tempted to go into endless discussions with your child. Learn to act after the second warning. Be consistent! That�s the only way to get respect.



About The Author
Written by Ineke Van Lint, psychologist. My goal is to help you achieve success and happiness. Accomplish your mission on earth and love yourself. Two free e-courses at http://www.theenthusiasm.com.










Health Insurance for the Recent College Graduate

As you graduate college and head into the great, big, scary world, there are probably a lot of things on your mind. First and foremost is finding a good job, then finding a place to live, and then maybe figuring out how to pay back those student loans. One thing that might not cross your mind is health insurance. All of your life, you�ve most likely been a dependent on your parents� coverage, but that ship is about to sail�if it hasn�t already.



We know what you�re thinking, �Why do I need health insurance? I�m young, I�m healthy, and doctor visits are few and far between. So why pay for something I�ll never use?� Hey, we understand where you�re coming from. But accidents and illnesses happen without warning, even to the strapping young adults such as you. Sure, health insurance is expensive, but not having it will cost you dearly.



First things to know



Let�s get one thing straight, health care in the United States is a nightmare, few will argue that. There are thousands of options when it comes to receiving care and paying for it, some of them good, some of them not so much. When it comes to choosing an insurance policy that�s right for you, confusion abounds. So let�s learn a little more about your options.













There are two essential categories of health insurance: managed care and indemnity plans. Though you�ll pay more for indemnity coverage, it offers much more flexibility than does a managed care plan. Through indemnity coverage, you�ll have your choice of doctor, lab, hospital or specialty clinic. When you seek medical care, you�ll have to pay an out of pocket expense�called a deductible�before your coverage will kick in. Deductibles range from a few hundred dollars up to $1,000 or more, depending on your policy. Also, indemnity plans require a co-payment on medical care



About The Author
Joseph Kenny writes for the UK Loan Store, with some great loan offers and more information on bad credit loans available on site.

Visit Today: http://www.ukpersonalloanstore.co.uk/

Acne: A Skin Condition Common Among Teenagers

Acne is a skin condition that many individuals have. Despite the fact that individuals of all ages can develop this common skin condition, there is one group of individuals who are more likely to develop it. That group is teenagers. Teenagers are more at risk for acne, especially when they begin to hit puberty. For that reason, there is a good chance that you may be the parent of a teenager who has an acne problem, whether that problem is large or small.



If you haven�t already noticed, times have changed. Unfortunately, this has led to appearance concerns among many teenagers. Although you might not necessarily think that acne is a big deal, it may be to your child. That is why it is extremely important that you talk to your child about their acne, especially if they have a severe case of it. Acne may go away on its own, but it might not. If your child constantly has problems with acne, it may be a good idea to schedule a visit with a healthcare professional.



When seeking treatment for your child�s acne problem, you will likely find that you have a number of different professional options. Most primary care physicians, also commonly referred to as family physicians, should be able to treat acne. This treatment will often include an over-the-counter medication or a prescription medication. The type of action taken will likely depend on how severe your child�s acne problem is. In addition to their primary care physician, you may also want to take your child to see a dermatologist. A dermatologist is a medical professional who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions.



Aside from being prescribed medications or given another treatment plan, you and your teenager will likely learn more about acne. Your healthcare provider, whether it is your primary care physician or a dermatologist, should provide you with information on acne. This information should not only include how to treat it, but how to manage acne outbreaks, as well as how to prevent them. Although this important information should automatically be explained to you, it might not be. When it comes to treating acne, it is important to learn more about it; therefore, if it is not automatically explained, you need to ask.



Regardless of which type of medical professional you are speaking with, a primary care physician or a dermatologist, you will likely learn, as mentioned above, that acne is not uncommon in teenagers. It fact, it has been stated that over half of all teenagers will develop a problem with acne, at one time or another. You may also learn that acne not only includes zits, but it also includes blackheads and whiteheads. You should also learn how and why acne develops. It is even possible that your healthcare physician may have also determined an exact cause for your child�s acne problem, such as unclean skin, clogged pores, or greasy health and beauty products.



As you can easily see, you and your child can learn a lot by meeting with a healthcare worker. Despite the fact that you are advised to seek professional assistance, it may not be possible. Whether you are without insurance or you cannot afford a doctor�s visit, your child does not have to suffer from acne. There are a number of over-the-counter medications that may be able to help reduce or completely eliminate the number of blackheads, whiteheads, or pimples that your teenager has. While prescription medications may work more effectively and quicker, over-the-counter medications are great alternatives. These relatively low-cost medications can be purchased from most department stores, drug stores, or grocery stores. The amount of time it takes for your child�s acne to clear up, if it even clears up at all, will all depend on what type of product you are using.













Since acne is relatively easy to treat, at least from your standpoint, you are advised to take action. Whether your teenager complains about their acne or if you think a problem may be in the process of developing, you are advised to get them the help that they need. Whether that help comes from a medical professional or an over-the-counter medication, your teenager will likely be please that action was initiated.

About The Author
Morgan Ulrich is a retired high school counselor, and writer for http://www.healthline.com. During his career he spent a great deal of time discussing the effects that http://www.healthline.com/channel/acne.html can have on a child's social life.

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